Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield


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But first, a caveat: In studying history one attempts to find primary sources for documenting events that occurred. A primary source is, in essence, an eyewitness to an event.

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Obviously, there are problems even with so-called primary sources. With two eyewitnesses to the same car accident, two viewpoints are invariably expressed, and often disagree in detail. Time has its diluting effect. Usually the further away a person is from the event in time, the less reliable the account. Yet even diaries written on the spot, under fire, on the battlefield will mention merely having a sharp fight in a wheatfield… and that is all, about the monumental, three-day epic battle of Gettysburg. With the passage of the years, one sometimes discovers after studying the historical characters involved in an event, that they had received criticism and had a reputation to defend.

Secondary sources—people who have repeated what they heard said about an event—are considered by historians to be less reliable and their accounts more subject to individual interpretation. Like the game we used to play in elementary school where we would sit in a circle and the teacher would whisper something in the ear of one child, who would whisper it to the next, who would whisper it to the next until it came full circle, whereupon the last child would repeat out loud a version that bore virtually no semblance to the original, that is how secondary sources often go.

Fortunately, much of history is not whispered, but published, for the viewing and comment upon by any and all interested parties. Again, the point of all this is a warning: study history at your own risk, because hardly anybody—including the people who were there—are really absolutely positive about exactly what they saw happen. Yet no one ever doubts that the event happened. There are many, many versions of historical events, and the interested reader must choose which he or she would believe.

That the event occurred is never in doubt; which version of the event is most cogent is continually debated.

With this in mind, it is easy to place these stories of unexplainable events in the category of secondary sources—very much like the elementary school exercise of varying versions of the same event. But the fact remains that something happened to precipitate the. This action might not be possible to undo. Are you sure you want to continue?

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Save For Later. Create a List. Summary "Ghosts of Gettysburg" is the first volume in Mark Nesbitt's popular book series.

Dare to take on Most Haunted Places when visiting Gettysburg

Read on the Scribd mobile app Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. I am afeared there are few die well that die in battle….

America's Bloodiest Battlefield Becomes Magnet for Ghost Hunters

Charles Bud Buckley and his wife Carolyn were most gracious in sharing their very personal tales of apparitions at the Cashtown Inn. Linda Marshall, of Gettysburg College, supplied the photograph of the apparition in Pennsylvania Hall. Barbara Klemmer, also of the administration at the College, helped gather information on sources. I wish also to acknowledge the late Sam Kessel, fellow park ranger in the early days, who shared his stories of unexplainable sightings while on night patrol of the park, and first piqued my interest in the ghost folklore of the battlefield.

Ellen Abrahamson, while working with me as a research assistant on another book, led me to several other sources for stories, including Fiona Crawley, who gave me the tales of Stevens Hall.

William A. Frassanito, Greg Coco, and Dr. Walter Powell helped in supplying historical tid-bits about the town and its structures. Thanks go to them; they are professionals, one and all. Years ago, when I first worked as a park ranger at Gettysburg, I asked one of my supervisors, Ron Wilson—now Chief Historian at Appomattox—if he knew of any ghost stories concerning the Gettysburg Battlefield.

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Ron just laughed and said, There are enough true stories about this battlefield that will scare the pants off of you. And he was right—to some extent. Energy—physical and emotional—was running towards an all-time high while humans teetered on the threshold between this world and whatever comes after. But there is a place for the other stories of the battlefield, stories that have no explanation, sights which consistently occur, undeniable visions through the decades and across the generations, which return again and again.

But first, a caveat: In studying history one attempts to find primary sources for documenting events that occurred. A primary source is, in essence, an eyewitness to an event. Obviously, there are problems even with so-called primary sources. With two eyewitnesses to the same car accident, two viewpoints are invariably expressed, and often disagree in detail. Time has its diluting effect. Usually the further away a person is from the event in time, the less reliable the account.

Meet 5 Guys that designed Ghost Hunting Gadgets that Retrieve Voices from the Dead!

Yet even diaries written on the spot, under fire, on the battlefield will mention merely having a sharp fight in a wheatfield… and that is all, about the monumental, three-day epic battle of Gettysburg. With the passage of the years, one sometimes discovers after studying the historical characters involved in an event, that they had received criticism and had a reputation to defend. Secondary sources—people who have repeated what they heard said about an event—are considered by historians to be less reliable and their accounts more subject to individual interpretation.

Like the game we used to play in elementary school where we would sit in a circle and the teacher would whisper something in the ear of one child, who would whisper it to the next, who would whisper it to the next until it came full circle, whereupon the last child would repeat out loud a version that bore virtually no semblance to the original, that is how secondary sources often go.

Fortunately, much of history is not whispered, but published, for the viewing and comment upon by any and all interested parties. Again, the point of all this is a warning: study history at your own risk, because hardly anybody—including the people who were there—are really absolutely positive about exactly what they saw happen.

Nesbitt will continue to add to the Ghosts of Gettysburg book series. Ghosts of Gettysburg III. Ghosts of Gettysburg IV. Ghosts of Gettysburg V. Ghosts of Gettysburg VI. Ghosts of Gettysburg VII.

Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield
Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield
Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield
Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield
Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield
Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield
Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield
Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield
Ghosts of Gettysburg II: Spirits, Apparitions and Haunted Places of the Battlefield

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